Eunice Boeve

A block from Jimmy's Life Quilt posted 9/3/14

Emily Morgan photo courtesy of the Kansas State Historical Society posted 8/9/14

Dr, Edith Eva Eger posted 7/11/14

Daisies are viewed by some as flowers, by others as weeds, depending on where you live. In Kansas, daisies can be tamed, in Montana, they are totally invasive, taking over fields and grazing lands. Posted 5/20/14

The top for this quilt was pieced by my grandmother and great aunts in Wyoming about 1915. My sister, Mabel, quilted it in Montana in 2003 (for me) and I have had it in my home in Kansas ever since. Someday it will go to my daughter, Kelly. Posted 4/22/14

Rosie the Riveter (She epitomized the women entering the work force in WWII) posted 3/17/14

The Fugates of Troublesome Creek posted 1/10/14

Orca Whales -- posted 11/13/13

Carmen Peone, Young Adult Author -- posted 10/5/13

Stealing Watermelons posted 8-15-13

Pet Crows - posted 7/25/13

The Next Big Thing - Books by Lee Rostadt and Janet Squires posted June 20, 2013

Robert Louis Stevenson "Some Fascinating Stories Concerning Life's End" posted 5/4/13

Olliff-Boeve Memorial Chapel posted April 7, 2013

Phillipsburg, Ks Photo by Shelia Roberts. posted Feb 28, 2013

Abraham Lincoln ---- posted 2/13/13

Emanciaption Proclamation posted 1-1-13

Santa in the window posted 12/7/12

Seth in "A Home For Us" artist Julie Peterson-Shea posted Nov. 7, 2012

"Betty Crocker" Ladies posted 10/8/12

My blue-eyed mother, Hazel E. Cline at 16 Posted 9-3-12

An Interview with Andrea Downing posted 7-31-12

In Cold Blood, a Kansas Murder Posted 7/1/12

Two Versions of an old Nursery Rhyme posted 6/4/12

Wicked Plants by Amy Stewart -- Posted 5/2/12

Boeve's Super Service Posted 4/3/12

Meg Justus, author of Repeating History http://mmjustus.blogspot.com/ Also see quick links on my Home page for Meg's website Posted 3/1/12

Boys of Baby Lager Camp playing chess, Photo by Ralph Morse, Life Magazine, posted 2/3/12

Hypnosis, once thought to be a sham, can be a vaulable tool to improve our lives. Posted Jan 2, 2012

Title: Atheists and Christmas ....... The painting of Jesus by Akiane Kramark age 8 posted Nov 30, 2011

Title: Autograph Books........Ron (my hus) then called Ronnie 8th grade 1945-46 - posted Nov 7, 2011

Title: Hobo Nickels........ carved by "Bo" George Washington Hughes - posted Oct. 2, 2011

The Buffalo Nickel

Title: Chief Standing Bear Posted 9/6/11

Title: Animal Meteorologists ........ Muffin age 6 posted 8/12/11

Title: The Sleep That is not a Sleep... Rip Van Winkle posted 7-4-11

Title: The Surviving/ Grieving Child - posted May 26, 2011

A Native American Tale posted April, 2011

Title: Embalming Bottles House - posted Mar. 29, 2011

Title: Memoirs and the "Now"in our lives - posted 2/21/11

Title: Even a Sparrow - My son, Ronnie, and the sparrow circa 1975 (note the dirt on Ronnie's chin) posted 1/27/11

Title: Women's suffrage Susanna M. Salter, age 27 Courtesy of the Kansas State Historical Society, posted 12/28/10

Title: Home on the Range - Brewster Higley's Cabin courtesy of the Kansas Sampler Foundation posted 10/7/10

Title: My sister's Dog - "Sadie" Posted 7/22/2010

Title: Comanche posted 6/28/10

Title: Moses Stocking - Mari Sandoz, 1896-1966 Library of Congress photo, posted 5/14/10

Title: Providence Spring, posted April 18, 2010

Title: Mary Fields - photo courtesy Wedsworth Library, Cascade, MT posted Mar. 17, 2010

Title: The Orphan Trains Photo courtesy of the National Orphan Train Complex, Concordia, KS - posted Feb. 21, 2010

Title: A Nez Perce Heroine -Lewis and Clark: Posted Jan. 27, 2009

Title: Our Immigrant Ancestors - The SS Zaandam: Posted Dec. 29, 2009

Title: The Lowly Pencil - Some pencil pushers: Bro Larry (circled) & class 1946-47, Libby, Mt : posted Dec 7, 2009

Title: The Old Time Cowboy - Me with my Cowboy Daddy Posted Nov. 14, 2009

Title: Did you know? - A Hubble photo of the stars in the universe posted Oct 14, 2009

Title: The Year Without a Summer - Mary Shelley painting by Rothwell 1800-1868 Posted Sept 30, 2009

Title: Early Day Hunting Stories - posted Aug 28, 2009 - Buffaloed by Fairlee Winfield

Title: The Legend of Bad Medicine ( Mountain in the background) July 29, 2009 post

Title: Ally and the Wolves - My granddaughter, Ally, and me with a wolf pup Ally and the Wolves, July 10 , 2009 post

Title: Old Glory The Number Thirteen - July 2 post

Title: Geo Caching - Daughters Kandy and Kathy and son-in-law, Tom, on a geo cache hunt Posted June 23 post

Title: The Free Enterprise Radon Health Mine - Location Boulder, MT May 29, 2009 post

Title: My Birthplace, Libby, Montana April 28,2009 post

Title: Kathleen Sebelius - Ron and I with Kansas Governor Sebelius, now Health and Human Services Secretary May 12, 2009 post

Title: My friend, Angela - A descendant of slaves who settled Niccodemus, Kansas April 10, 2009 post (photo by Carol Yoho)

Title: A Trip to Kentucky - (Kandy's cat) March 2009 post

Title: Margaret Borland, Texas Rancher - (Borland's Tombstone, Victoria, TX) posted March 2009

Title: Synsethesia (A special kind of color) - Kathy then and now posted Feb. 2009

Title: What Is This Thing Called Death? - posted Jan. 20, 2009 My late brother, Dan, and his wife, Lindy

Title: Photo From Past Years - posted Dec 31, 2008, A friend sent this old photo of my husband, daughter, and me in her Christmas card this year. Printed from a slide, it must be a mirror image as my husband's wedding band appears to be on his right hand.

The blog archives , from previous blogs, are located at the end of the row of pictures on the left. The date posted beneath each picture corresponds with a date in the archives.

Life Quilt V

September 3, 2014

Tags: quilts, funerals, Mortuary Management, failures, Pearl S. Buck

I’m ending this blog about life quilts with a story about a man named Jimmy. If judged by the world’s standards, I suppose one would call Jimmy a failure. He never had a real job, just an odd job now and then. He had no family, never married. He had no (more…)

Life Quilts IV

August 9, 2014

Tags: Nome, Alaska, The Great Race of Mercy, Balto, Angel of the Yukon, diphtheria epidemic of 1925

Emily Morgan’s life quilt was stitched with threads of healing and service to others. Dubbed the Angel of the Yukon, she was inducted into the Alaska Hall of Fame for her heroic efforts when in 1925 she helped stop a diphtheria epidemic in Nome and the surrounding villages. Born on a farm in Butler (more…)

A Third in a Series About Our Life Quilts (see I and II below this post)

July 11, 2014

Tags: Edith Eva Eger, Auschwitz, Adolph Hitler, Solomon Northrup, slaves, Jews

The stitching on Edith Eva Eger’s life’s quilt began at birth as all of our quilts do, but in 1944, at age sixteen, when her life was interrupted by imprisonment in Auschwitz, a German concentration camp, a place of misery, death, and horror for the Jews and others deemed unworthy of dignity and life, the stitches in her life quilt became deeper, finer, and more intricate. It was on that day, loaded in a cattle car on the train bound for that place of horrors, that she took to heart her mother’s words. As they traveled toward the camp, her mother would not survive, her mother's words became her mantra. “Everything can be taken away from a human being except what we put in your heads.” Always afterwards when asked how she got through all of it, Egers simply said, ”I created my own world and never let the Nazis get into my head. If I survived that day, the next I might be free.” (more…)

Life Quilts, Part II

May 20, 2014

Tags: flowers, daisies, weeds, quilts, life's journey, Carol Fugate, Charles Starkweather

I remember a story a pastor in our church told as an example of those who cannot see good in hardly anything versus those who see good in nearly everything. The story, he told, was about a King who treasured the beauty of the earth, and who wanted to know what kind of flowers grew in his kingdom. So he sent out two men to take note of every flower that grew on the land belonging to him. Eventually the men returned and reported to the king. “Here’s my list, Your majesty," one of them said, holding out a very short list indeed. "You only have a few flowers in your kingdom, but you sure have a lot of weeds." The other guy, holding a really, really long list, suddenly looked decidedly uncomfortable and acted as if he’d like to drop through the floor. Head hanging, he could barely meet the king’s eyes when the king, looking quite dejected himself, turned to him and said, “Well, and what did you find?” “Your Majesty," the man began, “I’m so sorry. They were all so pretty, I thought they were all flowers.” The totally optimistic person is hard to find. Mankind, it seems, has an almost automatically critical nature. It’s easier for us to find fault, to see many more weeds than flowers. (more…)

Life Quilts

April 22, 2014

Tags: Mark 6: 7-13, quilts, faith

Today, I am beginning a series of blogs that will last several months. Each blog will be a continuation of the last, like stitching peices of cloth together to make blocks and then the blocks stitched together to make a quilt.
There is a theatre production called “The Quilters” about the lives of some women living on the great plains of the Midwest. In the opening scene, the women have gathered to work on a quilt, and the talk among them is how their quilts are like their lives. How the “pieces of their lives” are linked together to make a whole. The many pieces become blocks and the many blocks become a completed quilt.
In one scene, Sarah, one of the women says, “You can’t always change things. Sometimes you don’t have no control. You’re just given so much to work with in a life, and you have to do the best you can with what you’ve got. Your materials is passed on to you, or is all you can afford to buy. That’s just what is given to you. But the way you put them together is your business, and that determines your fate. You can put them in any order you like.” (more…)

Eleven Tips on Hiring Women Employees

March 17, 2014

Tags: Rosie the Riveter, 1943, World War II, The draft, manpower shortage, cigarette commercials

This is an excerpt from the July 1943 issue of Mass Transportation magazine. (I edited the article slightly for brevity.) This was written for male supervisors of women in the work force during World War II. I can only add this succinct saying—never mind that it came from a Virginia Slims cigarette commercial. :-) "We’ve come a long way, baby.” Isn’t it funny, the ideas we so often accept as examples of sane and rational thinking? Racial equality was/ is just one example of “funny” thinking, and politics? No other words needed here for that one.

11 Tips on Getting More Efficiency Out of Women Employees
There’s no longer any question whether transit companies should hire women for jobs formerly held by men. The draft and manpower shortage has settled that point. The important things now are to select the most efficient women available and how to use them to the best advantage. (more…)

The Blues of Troublesome Creek

January 10, 2014

Tags: Troublesome Creek, Kentucky, The Fugates, William Quantrill, The War Between the States, slaves

In Max McCoy’s book, I, Quantrill, he writes about an affair Quantrill had with a young woman who’s skin was the color of a robin’s egg, her lips purple, her hair red. She tells him it’s a natural condition and that she is Hyacinth Fugate, from the Fugates of Troublesome Creek, who have naturally blue skin.
As you may recall, William Quantrill fancied himself a savior of the South’s way of life and during the War Between the States, raided the farms and homes and towns of northern sympathizers, murdering the men and all boys big enough to shoot a gun. A little digging and it becomes apparent that his “noble” actions for the South, are really excuses to murder and plunder. At one time, he’d entice slaves to leave their masters and while they were at it, take along Master’s horses and mules. Then he’d turn the slaves in and keep the horses and mules. Perhaps William Quantrill is best known for his raid on Lawrence, Kansas on August 21, 1863. He and some three hundred men rode into the town that morning and in a few hours, killed approximately 150 men and a few boys, burned many homes and businesses, and stole everything not nailed down. They departed as they came, leaving behind homeless, destitute, and grieving women and children.
Interesting that his raids would carry Quantrill to meet Hyacinth whose dream was to have a pale-skinned child. I wonder if Quantrill left her one. (more…)

Amazing, Those Animals

November 13, 2013

Tags: ocra whales, shepherd dogs, cocker dogs, black cats, Elizabeth Smart, Random acts of kindness, Stephanie LaLand

On Sunday, November 3, 2013, my daily paper reported this remarkable story of a pod of Orca whales accompanying a Washington State ferryboat carrying ancient artifacts belonging to the Suquamish tribe to a new museum. On this day as the ferry crossed Puget Sound, in view of downtown Seattle, a pod of about three dozen Ocra whales, aka killer whales, suddenly began swimming alongside. One observer said, “They were happily splashing around, flipping their tails in the water. We believe they were welcoming the artifacts home.”
The ancient artifacts, dug up by archeologists in the 1950s, came from the winter village of the Suquamish Chief Sealth, aka Chief Seattle. The 500 artifacts included tools, decorative items, and small pieces of bone and rock that dated back 2,000 years.
It was an exciting and emotional experience and resulted in much speculation. Some wondered aloud if the whales somehow knew… had perhaps picked up a mental energy… And some, I’m sure, wondered if their ancestors, maybe even Chief Seattle, himself, moved among them that day and might even had orchestrated the Orca escort.
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An Australian shepherd mix, he had survived a miserable, brutal, abused, and frightening puppy hood and was about a year old when our daughter and her family found him at the kennels and adopted him along with a bouncy black cocker mix, naming them Spencer and Max. (more…)

A Writer of Native American Stories for Young Adults

October 3, 2013

Tags: Native American, historical fiction, young adult, ColvilleConfederated Indian Reservation, Arrow Lakes Language, Extreme Challange Competitions, Tribal Elders

This month I am featuring Carmen Peone who is the author of three young adult novels about a native American girl. Her books are: Change of Heart, Heart of Courage, and Heart of Passion They are available through Amazon and Barnes and Noble. Visit her website at http://carmenpeone.com or Carmen Peone
Carmen has lived in Northeast Washington, on the Colville Confederated Indian Reservation since 1988. She had worked with a Tribal Elder, Marguerite Ensminger, for three years learning the Arrow Lakes Language and various cultural traditions. She has owned and trained her horses for thirteen years and has competed in local Extreme Challenge Competitions for three years. She lives with her husband Joe. They have four grown sons and six grandchildren. With a degree in psychology, the thought of writing never entered her mind, until she married her husband and they moved to the reservation after college. She came to love the people and their heritage and wanted to create a legacy for her sons. Carmen also works in the Inchelium School K-12 as a coordinator for the after school program: Rez Stop.
(more…)

Stealing Watermelons

August 15, 2013

Tags: Quantrill; Max McCoy; watermelons; seat belts; designated driver

My husband, Ron, said he never stole watermelons, just went along with the kids who did. He stands by that assertion saying, in the face of my doubt, “I was the designated driver.”
I don’t know, but I think, the get-away driver in a stickup is as guilty as the one holding the gun. I know he’s right there afterwards, wanting his share of the loot. And I imagine Ron had just as much red juice dripping off his chin as the others.
So tell me, I said, about those irresistible watermelon patches in your day. Those places where you didn’t steal any watermelons.
So he tells me about one summer night when a bunch of them were squeezed into an old jalopy one of the kids had (seatbelts hadn’t been invented yet) and they were out riding around, no particular destination in mind, until they came to a fenced field of watermelons and someone said, “Lets go get some watermelons.”
“No sooner said than done, I expect,” I said.
He nodded. “Yeah. They all scrambled out, crawled under the fence, and scurried like rats through that field, thumping melons ‘til they got a good ripe one. Then back to the car and me, the designated driver, watermelons clutched in their arms. Two of our gang were still missing when we heard the shotgun blast and we looked at each other, big-eyed and scared. The hair on my head stood straight up.”
“Yeah, you did have hair once,” I said.
He ignored my comment and went on, “Then here came one of the missing two, running flat out. He zipped under that fence and into the car, gasping out some words it took us a moment to understand. We’d noticed right away that he wasn’t carrying a watermelon and we wondered about that. We learned later he dropped it when the shotgun went off and the other kid with him went down like… like… Well, like he’d been shot. Which was what we finally got out of him when he calmed down enough to spit it out. Well, by the time he got it out so we could understand him, here came the other kid, running just as fast and skimming under that wire fence and into the jalopy. No watermelon in his arms either. The other kid said, ‘I thought you were shot! The gun went off and you went down and, and…’ ‘I tripped, you dummy!’ the other kid said.”
Later those kids, including my future husband, found out that the man had discovered that his shotgun fired several times in the air kept his melon field pretty well clear of two-legged nighttime raiders.
Although there was one young man who lived in a town just east of here who for which two-legged did not apply. When still a young boy, he lost a leg and became quite adept at using crutches. One summer Saturday he was hanging out in town when a man approached him and said, “I know you were in my melon patch last night and don’t deny it.”
“Well, yeah, I was,” said the boy. “But how did you know?
“You left some unusual tracks. Two holes and a foot print…two holes and a footprint…”
This story so tickled the man’s son and daughters that they included it in his obituary.
If you have a watermelon story to share, I would love it if you’d leave it in the comment section. (more…)
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